Category Archives: Massage

What is Thai Foot Reflexology?

Thai Foot Reflexology (or Thai Foot Massage) combines acupressure, stretching, and massage of the legs and feet with reflexology done with lotion and a wooden stick. I generally give the work in a manner similar to Thai massage, with the fully clothed recipient lying on a mat on the floor for the duration of the session. However, it can be done on the table, often as an add-on to a regular massage by request.

Jacksonville Florida Thai Foot Massage

Wooden stick used in Thai Foot Massage

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What to expect at your massage appointment

Are you new to massage? Or maybe just curious what goes on during a massage session at my office? Well, you’ve come to the right place, because in this post I’m going to outline what to expect, including specifics for both a traditional therapeutic massage on the table, and a Thai yoga massage. Continue reading

Prenatal and Postpartum Massage

Prenatal massage is a wonderful way to reduce stress and increase relaxation during the months of changes during your pregnancy.
It is performed in a comfortable sidelying or semi-reclining position on the massage table, bolstered by pillows to support and cradle the body.
There are many potential benefits to prenatal massage, such as:

  • reduced maternal blood pressure, heart, and respiratory rate
  • counters negative effects of prenatal stress
  • increased oxytocin and feelings of well-being
  • enhanced immune function
  • reduced labor time and complications
  • fewer prenatal complications
  • increased uterine blood supply to enhance fetal health

Though it is beneficial throughout pregnancy, it does not replace medical or midwifery prenatal care, so it is wise to consult your doctor before receiving a prenatal massage.

After giving birth, a new mother needs time to adjust and heal. Postpartum massage can help with and often can begin 24 hours after delivery. Some of the goals of massage post-pregnancy include:

  • providing nurturing and emotional support
  • healing from labor
  • preventing strain and pain from childcare activities
  • reducing residual pelvic and back pain

I am certified as a Prenatal Massage Therapist. Please contact me for more info, or to schedule an appointment.

Ch-ch-ch-changes

(10/4/16 UPDATE: I’m now in a different office, but it’s almost right next door…)

Well, it’s August, folks. How did that happen so fast?

After 7 years (3 of those involving a commute), I have decided to say goodbye to my friends, colleagues, and loyal clients at A Center for Therapeutic Massage in Gainesville. I love the town and the office, but it felt like it was time to focus my energies here in Jacksonville. If you are ever in Gainesville, and find yourself in need of an excellent massage, call the therapists at CTM–they are some of the best in the business! I’m so grateful for my time there, and for all the wonderful people I’ve worked on over the years. Gainesville has a special place in my heart. 🙂

I’m not sure how “new” this news is anymore, but back in the spring, I switched to a larger room in the same location–it has tile floor and lots of room to stretch out during Thai massages. IMG_20140801_134849 In May, I painted the room a pretty mint green to freshen things up, and just recently, I’ve added some sheer curtains, a burbling fountain, and some new stuff from my old office in Gainesville. IMG_20140728_113223It’s looking and feeling really nice, and there will probably be a few more little tweaks coming up. The only constant is change, right?

IMG_20140627_083712Even the kitties like it!

A few words about prenatal massage

Lately, I’ve encountered several people who were unaware that women could receive massage during pregnancy. They certainly can, and prenatal massage can provide a lot of benefits for the mother-to-be. Some of these benefits include decreased anxiety and pain, better sleep, and less complications during labor.

Prenatal massage is typically performed with the woman lying on her side, propped in a comfortable position with several pillows, and the session is designed to help her relax and let go of some of the stress and discomfort that can arise during this special time.

Women should discuss massage with their healthcare providers, and then make sure they find a knowledgeable massage therapist who knows how to take the proper precautions.

 

 

 

 

Book review

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So Teebs (the black and white cat) reminded me of my promise to tell you about one of my favorite massage books: The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook, by Clair Davies.

The subtitle is “Your self-treatment guide for pain relief,” and that is the truth. Basically, it breaks down the big red Travell trigger point manuals for the layperson, and gives symptoms, causes, and treatment for almost every trigger point of the body. I mentioned the Theracane yesterday, and that is one of the primary treatment tools. The book features many clear pictures of where to place the Theracane, the lacrosse ball, or the supported thumbs–whatever tool is best–for the most immediate relief.
Really, I can’t recommend this book enough. I refer to it several times a week for use with clients, and on myself at home. As you can see in the picture, I’ve added my own tabs for easy reference. As a massage therapist, I definitely suggest getting frequent massage, but in between, this book and some self-massage tools can often help life feel more bearable!